Executive Function: Strategies for the classroom

Executive functions consist of a family of 3 core skills: inhibitory control (resisting one’s first impulse and giving a wiser, more considered response instead; staying focused and persevering), working memory (mentally working with and playing with ideas and facts, relating one to another), and cognitive flexibility (thinking outside the box; looking at familiar problems in new ways).

Details

  • Wednesday, 24 May, 2017
    9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Course Code:   CPE17EXF

Course Information

Executive functions consist of a family of 3 core skills: inhibitory control (resisting one’s first impulse and giving a wiser, more considered response instead; staying focused and persevering), working memory (mentally working with and playing with ideas and facts, relating one to another), and cognitive flexibility (thinking outside the box; looking at familiar problems in new ways). These make it possible for us to think before we act, resist temptations, reason, creatively problem-solve, and meet novel, unanticipated challenges. They are important for every aspect of life. Executive functions are often more predictive than IQ of achievement, health, wealth, and quality of life and can override the effects of economic disadvantage.
“Brain-based” does not mean unchangeable. Executive functions depend on the brain, but they can be improved even in very young children and throughout the life span by exercising and challenging them, much as physical exercise hones our bodies. Educational practices that improve executive functions may not only lead to better academic outcomes, but also to reduced incidence or severity of mental health disorders such as ADHD. Many issues are not simply education issues or health issues; they are both. Many different activities have been shown to improve executive functions. Regardless of the activity, a few principles hold.
Learning Objectives:
• Become better able to describe what executive functions are.
• Become better able to explain principles & strategies for improving executive functions.
• To understand interrelations between executive functions, emotions, social needs, and physical well-being.
• To appreciate the bidrectional relation between prefrontal cortex (executive functions) and the amygdala (stress).

Accreditation
RIDBC Renwick Centre Continuing Professional Education programs are endorsed to provide NESA Registered Professional Development for teachers accredited at Proficient Teacher.

Presenter

  • Adele Diamond
    Adele Diamond is the Canada Research Chair Professor of Developmental Cognitive Neuroscience at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver. She is a member of the Royal Society of Canada and was recently recognized as one the 15 most influential neuroscientists alive today. Prof. Diamond is at the forefront of research on ‘executive functions’ and on the brain’s prefrontal cortex on which they depend. Executive functions include 'thinking outside the box' (cognitive flexibility), mentally relating ideas and facts (working memory), and giving considered responses rather than impulsive ones, resisting temptations and staying focused (inhibitory control, including selective attention). She has made discoveries that have improved treatment for two different medical disorders and discoveries that have impacted education, improving the lives of millions of children. Her work has shown that executive functions can be improved even in the very young. Adele Diamond was educated at Swarthmore (B.A., Phi Beta Kappa), Harvard (Ph.D.), and Yale Medical School (postdoc). Her many awards include an honorary doctorate (Honoris Causa) from Ben-Gurion University, the Bronfenbrenner Award for Lifetime Contributions to Developmental Psychology in the Service of Science and Society, named a “Woman of Distinction” by the YWCA, and named one of the “2000 Outstanding Women of the 20th Century.”

Location

Venue:  

Address:
361-365 North Rocks Road, North Rocks, New South Wales, 2151, Australia

Description:
North Rocks, Sydney, Australia Sydney is located on Australia's south-east coast. With an approximate population of 4.5 million in the Sydney metropolitan area the city is the largest municipality in Australia. Sydney is easily accessible by air, rail and road networks from other Australian cities. Located approximately 26 km north-west of the city centre, Renwick Centre is accessible via private and public transport to metropolitan areas such as Epping, Parramatta, Hornsby and the city. North Rocks is a suburban area of Sydney and is the home of the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children since 1961.

Public Transport

There are several public transport options for getting to and from the Renwick Centre within the Sydney metropolitan area.

Trains

Cityrail train stations are located in Epping (6 km away) and Parramatta (7km away) and have connecting bus services (refer to Buses section below) to the Centre. Epping train station is on the Northern, Newcastle and Central Coast lines with a journey time of approximately 30 minutes to the city (Central, Town Hall and Wynyard stations) and 20 minutes to Strathfield or Hornsby stations. Parramatta train station offers frequent services to the city (about 40 minutes of travel time) and is located on the Western, Cumberland and Blue Mountains lines. Both stations are wheelchair accessible.

Buses

There is a bus stop directly outside the RIDBC campus - services to Epping and Macquarie Centre - and another across the road outside the Westfield Shopping Centre for services to Parramatta and Blacktown. For latest info on these routes, please visit the Sydney Buses website.
Route Destination Wheelchair Accessible
549 Epping Most
546 Epping via Carlingford Most
546/549 Parramatta Most
630 Macquarie Centre No
630 Blacktown No
610/619* City Few
610/619* Rouse Hill Few
* Access to these bus services is from the M2 motorway at Barclay Road bus stop, a 20 minute walk (1.4 km) from the Centre.

Sydney Airport

Sydney Airport has domestic and international terminals and is approximately 35 km south-east of the Renwick Centre. A taxi fare between Sydney airport and the centre is approximately $110.00 each way. Alternatively, Shuttlbuz Airport Services (Phone: 1300 650 336) offers transfers at approximately $90 for a return ticket or $50 one way but bookings need to be made at least 24 hours in advance. Cityrail train stations are located within the domestic and international terminals. To get to the centre, you will need to change trains at Central to an Epping or Parramatta service and then either take a taxi or bus the remaining distance to the centre. Journey time by public transport is approximately 90-120 minutes.

Taxis

Companies providing a taxi service in the Sydney area include Premier Cabs (Phone: 13 10 17), Silver Service (Phone: 133 100), Taxis Combined (Phone: 8332 8888) and RSL Cabs (Phone: 132 211).

Tickets

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Full Registration show details + $250.00 (AUD)  

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