Imaginative play – a Platform for Learning in Young Children with Hearing

Do you work with young children with hearing loss and their families? Do you support young children with hearing loss in a childcare. Preschool or kindergarten? Are you interested to know what you can do to include more purposeful play as a basis for learning?

Details

  • Tuesday, 17 July, 2018 - Wednesday, 18 July, 2018
    9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Course Code:   CPE18DPS

Course Information

Do you work with young children with hearing loss and their families? Do you support young children with hearing loss in a childcare. Preschool or kindergarten? Are you interested to know what you can do to include more purposeful play as a basis for learning?

Children problem solve and see other people’s perspectives through playing ‘schools’ or ‘mums and dads’. In such activities, even very young children use their imaginations to contemplate different possibilities.

When we reflect and problem solve, we use our imaginations to think things through. This uniquely human ability enables us to imagine different outcomes. We act in the way we think is best, or learn from past experience to change our behaviour next time.  The development of these complex skills begins in infanthood.

Often, children with hearing loss are delayed in the development of symbolic and imaginative play in addition to language. Attend this workshop to learn about the normal development sequence and useful assessments. We’ll focus on lots of practical ideas so you can support children to develop these skills for better long term outcomes.

 

Part 1 – In the home

Without language to stimulate learning, the play skills of children with hearing loss can be delayed. Play becomes a loop of repetitive actions and behaviours, and parents find it difficult to engage and model rich language. For some, not over hearing means less understanding of everyday life experiences that children then act out in play. Understand the complex relationship between hearing loss, language, cognition and play along with some practical ideas to support families to have more successful interactions within their daily life with their young child with hearing loss to develop their communication, language and literacy skills in the home and other natural environments.

 

Part 2 – In the early childhood setting

Children problem solve and see other people’s perspectives through playing ‘schools’ or ‘mums and dads’. In such activities, even very young children use their imaginations to contemplate different possibilities. Complex imaginative role play involves planning, taking on roles, using props, creating dialogue as well as creating a sequences of events. It can take place over many days and often, children spend more time planning than playing. Researchers observe less of this play for all children. We’ll discuss - Is this a problem and how can we assess its development for children with hearing loss?

Presenter

  • Kate Dixon
    Kate Dixon is a primary teacher and teacher of the deaf. Kate has strong interest in the early development of children with hearing loss, effective family working, early literacy development and developmentally appropriate evidence based practice. She trained and worked in Australia, spending many years working at Taralye in Victoria before completing a Masters of Education with a special focus on early intervention and listening and spoken language at the University of Melbourne in 2001. In 2004 Kate moved to the United States and worked in early literacy and early intervention programmes in New Mexico, Utah and Colorado. This opportunity provided many new experiences in education and opportunities to work with diverse communities. In 2014 another move  to the United Kingdom where she now works for The Ear Foundation, a national charity which provides support, services and programmes for children and adults with hearing loss, their families and the professionals who work with them.

Location

Venue:  

Address:
361-365 North Rocks Road, North Rocks, New South Wales, 2151, Australia

Description:
North Rocks, Sydney, Australia Sydney is located on Australia's south-east coast. With an approximate population of 4.5 million in the Sydney metropolitan area the city is the largest municipality in Australia. Sydney is easily accessible by air, rail and road networks from other Australian cities. Located approximately 26 km north-west of the city centre, Renwick Centre is accessible via private and public transport to metropolitan areas such as Epping, Parramatta, Hornsby and the city. North Rocks is a suburban area of Sydney and is the home of the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children since 1961.

Public Transport

There are several public transport options for getting to and from the Renwick Centre within the Sydney metropolitan area.

Trains

Cityrail train stations are located in Epping (6 km away) and Parramatta (7km away) and have connecting bus services (refer to Buses section below) to the Centre. Epping train station is on the Northern, Newcastle and Central Coast lines with a journey time of approximately 30 minutes to the city (Central, Town Hall and Wynyard stations) and 20 minutes to Strathfield or Hornsby stations. Parramatta train station offers frequent services to the city (about 40 minutes of travel time) and is located on the Western, Cumberland and Blue Mountains lines. Both stations are wheelchair accessible.

Buses

There is a bus stop directly outside the RIDBC campus - services to Epping and Macquarie Centre - and another across the road outside the Westfield Shopping Centre for services to Parramatta and Blacktown. For latest info on these routes, please visit the Sydney Buses website.
Route Destination Wheelchair Accessible
549 Epping Most
546 Epping via Carlingford Most
546/549 Parramatta Most
630 Macquarie Centre No
630 Blacktown No
610/619* City Few
610/619* Rouse Hill Few
* Access to these bus services is from the M2 motorway at Barclay Road bus stop, a 20 minute walk (1.4 km) from the Centre.

Sydney Airport

Sydney Airport has domestic and international terminals and is approximately 35 km south-east of the Renwick Centre. Cityrail train stations are located within the domestic and international terminals. To get to the centre, you will need to change trains at Central to an Epping or Parramatta service and then either take a taxi or bus the remaining distance to the centre. Journey time by public transport is approximately 90-120 minutes.

Taxis

Companies providing a taxi service in the Sydney area include Premier Cabs (Phone: 13 10 17), Silver Service (Phone: 133 100), Taxis Combined (Phone: 8332 8888) and RSL Cabs (Phone: 132 211).

Tickets

Price Qty
Full Registrationshow details + $425.00 (AUD)  
Digital Accessshow details + $395.00 (AUD)  

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