It’s more than language: (Re)positioning the role of pragmatics in learning for deaf and hard of hearing children and young people

This one-day workshop will explore the links between pragmatics and social communication.  Participants will build knowledge informed by the latest research in the field of pragmatics in deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children and young people, and its application to a range of education settings. 

Details

  • Friday, 20 November, 2020
    9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Course Code:   CPE20PRAG

Course Information

NEW DATE: 20 NOVEMBER 2020

This one-day workshop will explore the links between pragmatics and social communication.  Participants will build knowledge informed by the latest research in the field of pragmatics in deaf and hard of hearing (DHH) children and young people, and its application to a range of education settings.  This workshop will also explore the link between pragmatic skills and other aspects of learning and development including theory of mind, cognition, literacy, executive function, social skills and pretend play.  The concept of metapragmatic skills, involving DHH young people’s explicit reflection upon pragmatic rules will be presented, with opportunities for participants to apply this lens to their own practice.  A range of approaches used to assess pragmatic skills in deaf and hard of hearing children and young people will be explored, including considerations for practical applications.  The workshop will present strategies for supporting pragmatic skills in DHH children and young people, including considerations for linking to curriculum and developing appropriate intervention.

Presenter

  • Louise Paatsch
    Biography: Associate Professor Louise Paatsch Associate Professor Louise Paatsch is the Associate Head of School (Research) in the School of Education in the Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University.  Her background is in oral language development, literacy, and deaf education.  She has worked in these fields since 1990 as a teacher of the deaf, academic and researcher at the University of Melbourne, the Bionic Ear Institute Melbourne, and Deakin University.  Louise has extensive experience in preparing teachers of the deaf, classroom teachers and allied health professionals to support the language and literacy skills of children who are deaf and hard of hearing. Louise’s research uses mixed methods approaches, including video methodology, to investigate pragmatic skill development, oral language development, speech perception and speech production in children who are deaf and hard of hearing in inclusive settings who use spoken language.  Specifically, her research, together with Associate Professor Dianne Toe, investigates pragmatic skills of students with hearing loss and their hearing peers within the contexts of question-and-answer games, expository discourse and spontaneous conversations. Other areas of research include investigating play and narrative development, teacher talk patterns during intentional oral language teaching, and literacy development and pedagogy.  Louise has many publications and has presented at both national and international conferences.  She has also presented workshops on oral language, pretend play and pragmatic skill development to teachers, teachers of the deaf and allied health professionals.
  • Dianne Toe
    Dianne Toe is the Deputy Head of the School of Education and Director of Professional Practice in the Faculty of Arts and Education at Deakin University. Associate Professor Toe’s background is in Psychology, Audiology, Deaf Education and Teacher Education. She has worked in these fields since 1983, with 27 years as an academic at the Universities of Melbourne and Newcastle and Deakin University. A strong foundation in developmental psychology underpins all of Dianne’s work.  At Deakin University, Dianne teaches on the Bachelor of Education (Primary) course with a focus on pedagogy, inclusive education and personalising learning. She is a respected presenter in teacher professional development as well as publishing in international journals Her publications are in the fields of inclusive education, cultural diversity, teacher education and disadvantaged schools. Dianne’s research uses empirical methodologies to investigate the assessment and education of children and young people who are deaf and hard of hearing. She has extensive experience in preparing teachers of the deaf and classroom teachers to work in inclusive settings. She has prepared teachers to work with students who are deaf for over 15 years at the University of Melbourne and the University of Newcastle.Dianne has been actively involved in research relating to the development of pragmatic language skills in children who are deaf or hard of hearing for more than 10 years, publishing widely and sharing this work in a range of international forums. Together with Associate Professor Louise Paatsch, Dianne’s research investigates pragmatic skills of students with hearing loss and their hearing peers within the contexts of question-and-answer games, expository discourse and spontaneous conversations.

Location

Venue:  

Address:
361-365 North Rocks Road, North Rocks, New South Wales, 2151, Australia

Description:

North Rocks, Sydney, Australia

Sydney is located on Australia’s south-east coast. With an approximate population of 4.5 million in the Sydney metropolitan area the city is the largest municipality in Australia. Sydney is easily accessible by air, rail and road networks from other Australian cities.

Located approximately 26 km north-west of the city centre, Renwick Centre is accessible via private and public transport to metropolitan areas such as Epping, Parramatta, Hornsby and the city.

North Rocks is a suburban area of Sydney and is the home of the Royal Institute for Deaf and Blind Children since 1961.

Public Transport

There are several public transport options for getting to and from the Renwick Centre within the Sydney metropolitan area.

Trains

Cityrail train stations are located in Epping (6 km away) and Parramatta (7km away) and have connecting bus services (refer to Buses section below) to the Centre.

Epping train station is on the Northern, Newcastle and Central Coast lines with a journey time of approximately 30 minutes to the city (Central, Town Hall and Wynyard stations) and 20 minutes to Strathfield or Hornsby stations.

Parramatta train station offers frequent services to the city (about 40 minutes of travel time) and is located on the Western, Cumberland and Blue Mountains lines.

Both stations are wheelchair accessible.

Buses

There is a bus stop directly outside the RIDBC campus – services to Epping and Macquarie Centre – and another across the road outside the Westfield Shopping Centre for services to Parramatta and Blacktown. For latest info on these routes, please visit the Sydney Buses website.

Route Destination Wheelchair Accessible
549 Epping Most
546 Epping via Carlingford Most
546/549 Parramatta Most
630 Macquarie Centre No
630 Blacktown No
610/619* City Few
610/619* Rouse Hill Few

* Access to these bus services is from the M2 motorway at Barclay Road bus stop, a 20 minute walk (1.4 km) from the Centre.

Sydney Airport

Sydney Airport has domestic and international terminals and is approximately 35 km south-east of the Renwick Centre.

Cityrail train stations are located within the domestic and international terminals. To get to the centre, you will need to change trains at Central to an Epping or Parramatta service and then either take a taxi or bus the remaining distance to the centre. Journey time by public transport is approximately 90-120 minutes.

Taxis

Companies providing a taxi service in the Sydney area include Premier Cabs (Phone: 13 10 17), Silver Service (Phone: 133 100), Taxis Combined (Phone: 8332 8888) and RSL Cabs (Phone: 132 211).

Tickets

Details Price Qty
Remote Access (live stream)show details + $150.00 (AUD)  
Digital Accessshow details + $100.00 (AUD)  
RIDBC Alumnishow details + $175.00 (AUD)  

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